• Odelsarven

The Realms of the Gods

Most of us have read the litteral descriptions of our Gods, their stories and myths. Such descriptions are mainly found in Snorri Sturlusons written versions of the poetic Edda and parts of the sagas. Since you are reading this article, you may be one of those that have acknowlegded that our Gods and myths represent something more than just stories. That is a good start, and a far better one that any known position from the academic world.


Before you read any further, please watch this video explaining more in detail about what our Gods really are and what they represent. This video, from the old archives, would serve as an introduction to the rest of this article;

The litteral texts (written down by Christians and not pagans) are necessary to know, in order to further see the obvious connections and patterns. The contained and translated texts, even if they are re-told in written format, several hundred years after the forced Christianization, and have gone through different degenerative phases of translations - they are very valuable. They are what we have. But, one must always try to go back to the original language of the Norse myths, in order to obtain all the clues that are hidden behind the different names and original words. Our mythology, Norse wisdom and world view, are a litteral well that never runs dry.


The purpose of this article is that you perhaps can be able to see the clear patterns, and how these come forward as our ancient true spiritual science, either we find ourselves looking at a micro or a macro cosmos, in ourselves or out in eternal space.


Let us first take a closer look at a litteral text. This text is composed especially for the reader, as a sum-up on a typical litteral level, and has the same litteral format the most are familiar with - based upon the poems of the poetic Edda.




In the beginning there is no sand, nor sea or waves, soil is not or the sky above. Ginnungagap is there, but no grass. South in Ginnungagap, the huge emptiness, you will find Múspellsheimr, the realm of destruction. It is ice and heat there, and Surtr reigns, with his flaming sword he guards the borders. North in this emptiness you will find Niflheimr, filled with ice, frost and fog. From Niflheimr out in Ginnungagap streams flow, Élivágar, and the rays from Múspellsheimr make it so that the living creatures are made, the jötunn (Ettin) Ymír and the cow Auðhumbla. Ymír gives. from himself, birth - and from him come all the jötnar. Auðhumbla is licking the icy rocks, and by those Búri is made. His son, Burr, is the father of Óðinn and his brothers, and from him come all the Æsír. The sons of Burr kill Ymír, and in his blood they drown the whole kin of jötnar, except one, who saves himself togehter with his wife in a boat, and from those two - all kins of jötnar derive. The sons of Burr takes the body of Ymír, throws it in the middle of Ginnungagap., and of the body they create the world. They make the soil from his flesh, from his blood the sea, from his bones the mountains, from his hair the trees and from his skull the heavens - they place it high above the soil, but the brain they scatter in the air, and of that the clouds are made. Around Jörð (earth) the sons of Burr let the deep ocean stream, and by the outskirts the jötnar find their home, in Jötunheimr and in Útgarðar far north. From the heavens to the earth the Gods lay the bridge Bifröst, or the rainbow.


From the sparks of Múspellsheimr the sons of Burr make the celestial creations, and Sól (the sun) and Máni (the moon) are placed into each ones chariot. A man named Mundilfari has two children, light and beautiful, and he is so proud of them that he names the son Máni and the daughter Sól. The son is set to run the chariot of the moon and the daughter the chariot of the sun. They are always in a hurry, because two tröll in the shape of wolves chase the sun and the moon to swallow them. When they catch up, we are in the times of Ragnarök, the new beginning.


The jötunn woman Nött (night) is black and dark, as her kin, and she is married to the Æsír-son Dellingr, their son is Dagr (day), and he is light and beautiful, as his kin. Óðinn places both mother and son in the skies, and gives them each a horse and a chariot and offers them to run each day and night over the earth. Nött rides first with the horse Hrímfaxi, and each morning it dews the grounds. Dagr follows after with the horse Skinfaxi, and it spreads light over air and the earth.


The dwarves come as worms in the flesh of Ymír, and the Gods give them the knowledge of men and human shapes. They are skillful blacksmiths and find their homes in the earth and inside rocks - but they can not bear the rays of the sun. You can hear the sound of the dwarves or the echo from the mountains. Four dwarves, Austre, Vestre, Nordre and Søndre (east, west, north and south) are set by the Gods to carry the skies.


The Gods make álfar (the elves), the lightelves are kind, happy and clear as the sunshine, but the darkelves are black and less good.


The three brothers Óðinn, Vile/Hönír and Vé/Lóðurr walk down by the shores. There they find two trees and make humans from them. The man, Askr, and the woman, Embla. Óðinn gives them breath and life, Vile the mind and Vé blood and fair beauty. The Gods give them Miðgarðr, and from Askr and Embla men derive.


The tree Yggdrasill is the biggest and most wonderful of all trees, and its evergreen branches reach over the whole world, and they reach throughout the celestal sky. It has three roots. One comes from the well Hvergelmir in Niflheimr, and there you will find the serpent Níðhöggr - gnawing on the root together with other serpents. The second root you will find in Jötunheimr, and below it you will find the well of the wise Ettin Mímir. In this well you will find all the wisdom and knowledge of men. Each morning, Mímir drinks from the well, and Óðinn comes there asking to drink from it. To do so, he has to sacrifice one eye. The third root you will find amongst the Gods in Ásgarðr, and below it you will find the well Urðarbrunnr. There, the Gods hold their assembly, and every day they ride over the bridge Bifröst. By this well you will find a beautiful hall, and the three Nornir - Urðr, Verðandi and Skuld are sitting there spinning the threads of fates. Their names are past, present and future. They give life and destiny, and nothing can change it.


In the crown of the tree you will find an eagle that knows much. A squirrel, Ratatoskr, is running up and down the tree trunk and brings connection between the eagle and Níðhöggr. Four deer run around amongst the branches and eat leaves. This way, the tree suffers more than men know of. The deer eat the leaves, on the sides it rots, and the serpents gnaw on the root. But, the tree is always evergreen, under the protection of the Nornir. Every day they water it from the sacred well of honor, so it may not rot. Two birds swim in the well of honor - they are called swans - and from those all birds alike derive.


In the realm in the middle, you will find the Gods, in Ásgarðr. In the middle of this realm you will find Iðavöllr, and this field is the gathering place for the Gods. Here you will find the throne of Óðinn, Hliðskjálf, and from this high seat you can see out over the whole world and into all realms. In Ásgarðr the Gods build two beautiful halls, Glaðsheimr or the glorious, glad and shining hall of the Gods, and Vingólf or the friend hall for the Godesses or Ásynjur. But, the most wonderful hall in Ásgarðr is the hall of Óðinn, Valhöll, the hall of the fallen, the feasting hall of the Gods. It is easy to know, the attic is made of spears, the roof is covered by shields, and armour cover the benches in the hall.


Óðinn is the highest and the oldest of all the Æsír. He reigns everything and the other Gods honor him as children honor their father. He is called Valfaðr or the father of the dead and fallen. All of the fallen einherjar is gathered by Óðinn in Valhöll. The number steadily increases, and they enjoy fighting and slaying eachother every day. But, when night falls, the slain rise again, and they ride in agreement to Valhöll. They feast on the pork of Sæhrímnir, and that boar is boiled every day - but each night it is alive again. The chef is named Andhrímnir. A goat named Heiðrún stands on the roof of Valhöll, and from its udder flows mead down in a tray that is so big that all the einherjar drink from it. The warriors, the ones who fight alone, are served by the valkyrjur, they serve the mead. They are called the maidens of Óðinn. They deside who will fall and win the battle. Some are of the kin of Gods, like Góndul and Skøgul, others are of the kin of men, like Hildur. Óðinn has many names, Yggr - the terrible, Hår - the mighty, the grey, hard in battle, Sigfaðr - the father of victory, and many more. Óðinn only drinks wine, and the food is given to the two wolves Geri and Freki. On the shoulders sit to ravens, Huginn and Muninn, the mind and the memory. When day comes, they are sent out in the realms and when night falls they return to tell of the news. The horse of Óðinn is named Sleipnir, it has eight legs and is the quickest of all, with access to every realm. Óðinn rides to battle on Sleipnir with a golden helmet, a beautiful armour and the spear Gugnir, that hits anything it is aimed at. On the finger is the beautiful golden ring Draupnir, and from it it dripps every ninth night eight just as beautiful rings. Hermóðr is the deputy. Óðinn is the God of wisdom and poetry. His one eye is pledged by Mímir to drink from his well, and the mead of Suttungr is stolen with betrayal and cunning to recieve the poetry. Óðinn is the master of the Runes, all the secrets.


Þórr is the son of Óðinn and Jörð. He is the strongest of Gods, and his realm is named Þrúðvangr, the realm of strength, and his hall is named Bilskilnir, the lightning blink, has 540 rooms and is the biggest one. Þórr is known by many names, and he rides a chariot pulled by two goats named Tanngrisnir and Tanngnjóstr. When he rides, Jörð shakes and cracks, and it burns below his chariot. You hear a high sound, the thunder of Þórr. He is always in battle with jötnar and tröll, and when he is angry his eyes flame like fire. Þórr posesses three precious things, Mjöllnir, the crusher - well known by tröll, Megingjörð, the strength belt that doubles the strenght of the carrier and the iron gloves. No one is so clever that one can mention all the great acts of Þórr, but he is not always too wise, he can be fooled by Óðinn and others alike. His wife Síf posesses the golden hair the dwarves forged, and Þjalf and Roskva follow Þórr on his travels.


Baldr is the second son of Óðinn, and of Baldr it is only good to tell; deliberately good and everyone praises him. He is so beautiful and fair that it shines of him. The whitest of all flowers is named Balderbrå, because it looks like his eyebrows. Wise and mild he is too, living in Breiðablik, where nothing unpure is to be found. He is married to his faithful wife Nanna.


Njörðr lives in Nóatún, and he reigns for the winds, the sea and fire. He is so rich that he can provide everyone asking. He is of the kin of Vanír, but when the Æsír and the wise Vanír are to make piece, they exchange hostages. The Vanír send Njörðr to Ásgarðr, and the Æsír send Hönír to the Vanír. Njörðr is married to Skaði - of the kin of jötnar. She is of the will of living where her father Þjazi derives, in Þrymheimr up in the mountains. But Njörðr is of the will to live by the sea. They agree to be alternately in Þrymheimr and Nóatún. But, when Njörðr have been nine days in Þrymheimr he will have enough of it. The screams of the wolves are terrible, compared to the songs of swans, and Skaði will not have the calmness of night with the screams of birds and the sounds of the ocean. So, they divorce, and Skaði resides in the mountains.


Ægir reigns the ocean, and is of the kin of jötnar, but the friend of the Æsir. Every year he holds a feast for them in his hall, and each time the hall shines of gold. His wife is named Rán, and she has a net she cathes men at sea with. The daughters of Ægir and Rán are the waves.


Freyr is the son of Njörðr and reigns for rain and sunshine, the fertility of the soil and wealth amongst men. He is glad and good and make no sorrow - but releases that of what is bound and trapped. Álfheimar is the place he resides, and he rides the boar Gyllinbursti, that rides in air and sea and shines like the sun. His ship is Skíðblaðnir and it is built by the dwarves. It always has good winds, and sails just as good on land as in the air. It is big enough to contain all of the Æsir, but it can also be folded together and placed in a pocket. Freyr is married to the beautiful Gerðr, and she is of the kin of jötnar. To get her, Freyr has to sacrifice his mighty sword, that he is missing.


Týr is the bravest of the Æsir. In battle he reigns for victory. He is the deity for battle, and he never reconciles, but reigns justice. He is one-handed, because the wolf Fenrir bites the other hand off, when Týr sacrifice it.


Bragi is also one of the sons of Óðinn. He is wise and well spoken, and a master of poetry. His wife is named Iðunn and she hides the golden apples the Æsir have to eat in order to not grow old.


Heimðallr is the name of the hvite áss, and he is big and sacred . Nine jötunn maiden sisters derive from him. His teeth is of gold and his horse is named Gulltoppr, and Himinbjörg is his realm, laying beside Bifröst. He is the guardian of the Æsir and sits by the end of the skies to guard the bridge from the bergrisi. He needs less sleep than a bird and can both day and night see 100 miles and hear the grass and the wool on the sheep grow. When he blows his horn Gjallarhorni the sound is heard in all realms.


Forseti is the son of Baldr and Nanna. He holds and reigns the high seat of judgement, and his hall is named Glítnír. The roof is of silver and rests on pillars of gold. He evens out all imbalances.


Höðr is blind and very strong. He becomes the killer of Baldr against his will. His name means war.


Víðarr is the name of the silent áss, and he is the second strongest after Þórr. He is highly trusted amongst the other Æsir when they are in need. He is the avenger, and he kills Fenrir with his thick iron boot during Ragnarök, the new beginning of the Æsir.


Váli is a brave warrior and an excellent shooter. He revenges the death of Baldr, and survives each Ragnarök togehter with Víðarr. Höðr, Víðarr and Váli are all sons of Óðinn, with different mothers.


Ullr is the stepson of Þórr, and he is a good shooter and an excellent skiier, so good that no one can beat him. His realm is named Ýdalir, the valley of the yew, and all make bows from the yew.


Friggr is the highest of the Ásynjur or the Godesses, and she is the wife of Óðinn and the mother of Baldr. Her realm is Fenasálir. She knows the destiny of all men, but she is silent about it. She has two major sorrows, the first when her son Baldr dies, and the second when her husband Óðinn is swallowed by the wolf. Her servant is named Fulla, she is a maiden and have golden ribbons in her long blond hair, and she carries the box of Friggr, watches over her shoes and make all secret errands.


Freya is the highest of the Ásynjur or the Godesses, after Friggr. She has other names as well, like Vanadís, because she derives from the álfar. She is the daughter of Njörðr and the sister of Freyr. Her realm is named Folkvangr, and in her hall there are many seats. She rides a chariot pulled by two wild cats, and she carries the beautiful necklace Brísingamen. When she rides to battle, she chooses half of the fallen, and she decides whom. She is married to Óðr, but he is always away. Freya cries tears of gold in his absence, and she is especially wise in matters of love.


There is still one that counts amongst the Æsir, but they also call him the root to all betrayal, friction and potentially bad things amongst the Gods. His name is Loki, and his parents are jötnar. But, in the beginning of things, he is the foster brother of Óðinn. He looks handsome, but is devious and not all good. This leads the Æsir into all kinds of trouble, but they need Loki to get out of the trouble again. His wife is named Angrboða, and they have three children; the wolf Fenrir, Miðgarðsormr and Hél. When the Æsir know that those are raised in Jötunnheimr and the the predictions are that they will cause great harm, Óðinn calls them to him. The serpent is tossed into the sea that flows all around, and that serpent grows so much that it encircles Miðgarð and bites its tail. They throw Hél down to Niflheimr, there she reigns over all in the realm of death. The road to Hél is named Hélvegr, and it goes north and down, through deep and dark valleys, and over Gjallarbrú, covered with gold. In her realm it is static and cold, dwelling, like ice. Her tray is named hungr (hunger), her knife is named sulltr (starvation), the doorstep is named slysfall, (bad luck) her bed is named sjukrdómr (sickness) and the wall carpets are named bistr sorg (threatening sorrow). She is herself half blueblack and half white, so she is easy to recognize, with her face being harsh. Her dog is named Garmr, and it is bloody red on the chest and barking. The black rooster crows at Ragnarök, and her horse is named Hélhestr, with only three legs. The Æsir raise the wolf, but only Týr has the courage to feed it. But, when the Gods are seeing how much the wolf grows every day, and the warnings that come about its potential of great harm, they bind it to a pole. But, the wolf wears loose from the chains. Óðinn let the dwarves in Svartalfheimr forge a new chain with the name Gleipnir, made out of the sound of footsteps of the cat, the roots of the mountains, the beard of women, the breath of fish and the tendons of the bear. The chain is smooth and soft, like silk, but firm and strong. The Æsir travels out on an island and bring the wolf. They show it Gleipnir, but the wolf is afraid of betrayal and will not be bound before one of the Gods place one hand in its mouth as a pledge. Týr is the only one brave enough to do this, and his right hand is placed in the wolves mouth, and the wolf is bound. Fenrir kicks hard, but the harder the wolf kicks, the harder the chain tightens. The Æsir laugh of this, except Týr who looses his hand. The end of the chain is bound deep down in Jörð. The wolf gapes awfully, twisting and turning back and forth and tries to bite around. The Æsir sticks a sword in its mouth so its stuck open, it roars and froths - until Ragnarök.




Let us now take a closer look at what the relevant Norse names in fact represent, and what they are symbols of. We will have to remember that they represent well known things, both in the macro and micro cosmos, from a small little seed to the universe itself.



Ginnungagap

The wide emptiness.

The space of creation.

The space of duality.

The universe.

The container.

The womb.

ᛁ*īsaR (iss)

Ice, static.

ᚠ*fehu (fé)

Fire, dynamic.

ᛚ*laguR (logr)

Water.


Múspellsheimr

The realm of light and fire.

The beginning.

The spark of life.

The element fire.

ᚠ*fehu (fé)

Fire, dynamic.

The counterpart of Niflheimr.


Surtr

The fire Ettin.

Wild fire, destructive.

The necessarry destruction before creation.

The flames giving birth from the ashes - the necessary death for fertile new life.

ᚠ*fehu (fé)

Fire, dynamic.

ᚦ*þurisaR (þurs)

Ettin

ᚲ*kauna (kaun)

Wound, slain.

ᛉ*algiR (elgr)

Elk, moose, rune of birth.


Niflheimr

The realm of ice, frost and fog.

The dwelling realm of the seed, thought and ancestors.

The element water.

ᛁ*īsaR (iss)

Ice. Static. Contained water.

The counterpart of Múspellsheimr.


Élivágar

The eternal flow.

The eternal pulse.

The pulse and breath of the universe.

The pulse and breath of the sea.

ᛚ*laguR (logr)

Water.


Ymír

The high sound of creation.

The first Ettin.

The creation of the the universe (eternal, the instant).

The ancestor (primordial).

*þurisaR (þurs)

Ettin, Troll, the twin, The Old King, the placenta.


Auðhumbla

The darkness before light.

The twilight before creation.

The soil before growth.

The seed sparked with life force.

ᛈ*perþu

Earth, cliff, stone, birth, luck.


Búri

The first of Gods.

The ancestor.

The sky-God and the earlier Týr.

The sun and the moon.

ᛋ*sōwilu (sól )

The sun.

ᛏ*tīwaR (Týr)

War, balance, justice - masculine, Týr.

The Mithra rune (MithOdin).


Óðinn

Thought and spirit.

The ancestor.

Your accumulated ancestors in you.

The unborn child.

The one re-incarnated.

War.

Balance.

Consequence.

Honor.

Inspiration.

Creativity.

Mental strenght.

Blood memory.

The planet Uranos.

ᚨ*ansuR (áss)

Æsir, önd (spirit), breath.

ᛚ*laguR (logr)

Water. Blood memory.

ᛟ*ōphila (óðal)

Allodial heritage.


Jörð

The earth.

The earth Godess.

The daughter of Nátt and Ánnar.

Mother.

The mother of Þórr.

ᛟ*ōphila (óðal)

In the shape of the pregnant mother.


Jötunheimr /Útgarðar

The outer world.

The old world.

The home of the Giants.

The lithosphere.

The atmosphere.

Primordial forms and raw untamed natural forces.

ᚢ*ūruR (úrr)

Wild bull, ancestral power.

ᚦ*þurisaR (þurs)

Ettin, Troll, the twin, The Old King, the placenta.


Bifröst

The bridge.

The trembling bridge.

The transition (to Ásarðr, the world of the breathing).

The connection between the realms of life and death.

The rainbow.

The vision between the realms, the colurs and sight upon the rays of Sól.

The entrance out from Jörð, the burial mound.

The cervix, the passage out to the realm of the breathing.

ᚱ*raidu (reið)

To ride on a horse, on a chariot.

ᛈ*perþu

Earth, cliff, stone, birth, luck.

ᛉ*algiR (elgr)

Elk, moose, rune of birth (upside down in death (Gjallarbrú, Hél)).

ᛜ*ingwaR (Ing)

Frey - Yngvi Frey, the seed, the kin, the ancestor and child, opening of mother/Jörð/burial mound.


Sól

The sun.

The gift to Jörð.

The battery and recharge of mother Nature.

The daughter of Mundilfari.

The seeing one eye of Óðinn raising in the east.

ᚷ*gebu (gjof )

Gift.

ᛋ*sōwilu (sól )

The re-incarnated eternal sun - Álfröðull


Máni

The moon.

The gift to Jörð.

The measurer of time.

The maker of tides.

The egg.

The son of Mundilfari.

The blind one eye of Óðinn reflected from the realm of death.

ᚷ*gebu (gjof )

Gift.

ᛃ*jāra (ár)

Year.


Mundilfari

The affordable gift.

The one moving in particular times.

The father of Sól and Máni.

The gifts to Jörð

ᚷ*gebu (gjof )

Gift.


Tröll

The Trolls.

Chanting/sorcery.

ᚦ*þurisaR (þurs)

Ettin, Troll, the twin, The Old King, the placenta.


Ragnarök

The new beginning.

The end of the Gods.

The new beginning of the Gods.

ᛉ*algiR (elgr)

Elk, moose, rune of birth.


Nött

The night.

The daughter of the Ettin Nörvi.

Married to the Ettin Naglfarí with the child Auðr (wealth).

Married to the Ettin Anarr (night) with the child Jörð.

Married to the Æsir Dellingr (fine, splendid, dawn) with the child Dagr (day).

ᚦ*þurisaR (þurs)

Ettin, Troll, the twin, The Old King, the placenta.


Hrímfaxi

The horse pulling the moon.

The one with frost in the hairs.

The frosty horse.

ᚱ*raidu (reið)

To ride on a horse, on a chariot.

ᛖ*ehwaR (jór)

Horse.

ᛚ*laguR (logr)

Water. The tides and gravitation.


Skinfaxi

The horse pulling the sun.

The shining horse.

ᚱ*raidu (reið)

To ride on a horse, on a chariot.

ᛖ*ehwaR (jór)

Horse.

ᛋ*sōwilu (sól )

The sun.


Álfar

The ancestors in form of eternal spirits.

The rivers and water.

Water in the soil dwelling (blackelves).

Water in the rivers (lightelves).

ᛚ*laguR (logr)

Water.


Vile/Hönír

The willpower.

The strong.

The physical body.

The scream upon birth (upon sunrise - rooster (Hönir), the rooster in Valhöll and Hél.

The old name for Þórr.

ᚢ*ūruR (úrr)

Wild bull, ancestral power.

ᛉ*algiR (elgr)

Elk, moose, rune of birth.

ᚨ*ansuR (áss)

Æsir, önd (spirit), breath.


Vé /Lóðurr

The loved one.

The holy one.

The new chieftain.

The blood.

To stick togehter and cause movement.

Vé - the old name for Freyr.

Lóðurr - the old name for Loki.

ᚺ*hagalaR (hagall)

Frosty rain.

ᛜ*ingwaR (Ing)

Frey - Yngvi Frey, the seed, the kin, the ancestor and child.


Askr

The ash tree.

Another name for Yggdrasíll, the cosmic tree, axis mundi, the womb.

The first man (every man).

ᛗ*mannaR (maðr)

Men (human beings).

ᛉ*algiR (elgr)

Elk, moose, rune of birth.


Embla

The elm tree, with the same symbolism as the ash tree.

The first woman (all women).

ᛗ*mannaR (maðr)

Men (human beings).

ᛒ*berkana (bjarkan)

Birch, love - feminine, Freya.


Miðgarðr

The middle ground.

The world in the middle.

The realm of animals, plants and soil.

The realm between death and re-birth.

The realm of the womb (in the middle, the transitory state).

ᛈ*perþu

Earth, cliff, stone, birth, luck.


Yggdrasill

The world tree.

The tree of life.

The comsmic pillar.

Axis mundi.

The terrible and scary horse.

The placenta - the tree of life in the womb of a mother.


All trees are sacred, and all trees are represented by a deity. You find the symbolism on every level, a single cell is its own tree of life, a little seed - an acorn that contains a mighty huge oak tree, one human body is a tree of life, the placenta is the tree of life - giving physical and spiritual nourishment to a new life (from the old to the new, from the ancestor to the decendant), our solar system and universe are the symbolic Yggrasill, and so on.


ᚱ*raidu (reið)

To ride on a horse, on a chariot.

ᛖ*ehwaR (jór)

Horse.

ᛈ*perþu

Earth, cliff, stone, birth, luck.

ᚾ*naudiR (nauð )

Emergency, need of help, stuck.

ᚲ*kauna (kaun)

Wound, slain.

ᛇ*īwaR (ýr)

The yew.

ᛉ*algiR (elgr)

Elk, moose, rune of birth.


Hvergelmir

The well in Niflheimr.

The one year draught, the accomplishments of a life.

Filled by drips of the horns of the deer Eikþyrnir (honor) in Yggdrasill.

The well make up the rivers with the different symbolic names (nor: Sval, Gunntra, Fjorm, Fimbultul, Slid og Rig, Sylg og Ylg, Vid, and Leipt).

The draught of the re-born, the new Kings (deer crowns).

The water of ancestors, you.

ᛁ*īsaR (iss)

Ice.

ᛚ*laguR (logr)

Water.


Níðhöggr

The worm that gnaws on Yggdrasill.

Dishonor.

The wear and tear throughout life and every life form.

*naudiR (nauð )

Emergency, need of help, stuck.


Mímir

The memory.

The experienced past.

The head/skull that gives council to Óðinn.

The placenta, giving council from ancestor to decendant.

*ōphila (óðal)

Allodial heritage.

ᛚ*laguR (logr)

Water.


Urðarbrunnr

The well of Mímír, and that of eternal remembrance.

The well of honor.

The well of all honor from the years draught.

The past.

*ōphila (óðal)

Allodial heritage.

ᛚ*laguR (logr)

Water.


Ásgarðr

The home of the Æsir, the Gods.

The home of our honorable ancestors, accumulated, in you.

The home of the breathing (áss/önd - breath).

The solar system, Stjerneheimen (the realm of the stars).

ᚨ*ansuR (áss)

Æsir, önd (spirit), breath.

*ōphila (óðal)

Allodial heritage.


Nornir

The Godesses of fate and destiny.

The secret and warning.

The bringers of life.

The bringers of death.

ᚷ*gebu (gjof )

Gift.


Ratatoskr

The one that runs about and give aid.

The blood in the veins.

The sap in the trees.

The electric signal of the brain and nerves.

ᚠ*fehu (fé)

In the shape of ancestral flame, blood.

ᛚ*laguR (logr)

Water.


Iðavöllr

The field of ideas.

The field of council.

The mind - nourished.

The realm of the re-born.

The state of exit from the burial mound.

The state of exit from the mother (birth).

ᛞ*dagaR (dagr)

Day.

ᚷ*gebu (gjof )

Gift.

ᛟ*ōphila (óðal)

Allodial heritage.

ᚹ*wunju

Joy.


Hliðskjálf

The shivering and trembling opening.

The free mind.

The opening of the spirit (Önd).

ᚨ*ansuR (áss)

Æsir, önd (spirit), breath.


Valhöll

The realm of the chosen ones.

The realm of the fallen and slain.

The hall of honor.

The spirits between life and death - before re-born.

The world in the middle, the womb containing the spirit.

The burial mound of an ancestor to be re-born.

ᛏ*tīwaR (Týr)

War, balance, justice - masculine, Týr.

The Mithra rune (MithOdin).

ᛟ*ōphila (óðal)

Allodial heritage.


Einherjar

The ones who fight alone.

The ones with honor.

The ones chosen to be re-born.

The honorable ancestors remembered.

ᛜ*ingwaR (Ing)

Frey - Yngvi Frey, the seed, the kin, the ancestor and child.

ᛟ*ōphila (óðal)

Allodial heritage.


Sæhrímnir

The tests of water.

The ash covered sea animal (ash is a symbol of dead ancestors, water of ancestral spirits).

The tests of the ancestors for the Einherjar.

The strife and tests necessary to be re-born.

The boar the einherjar eat, the clowed animal connected to soil (Jörð, the mother).

ᚢ*ūruR (úrr)

Wild bull, ancestral power.

ᚦ*þurisaR (þurs)

Ettin, Troll, the twin, The Old King, the placenta.

ᛚ*laguR (logr)

Water.


Andhrímnir

The tests of the spirit.

The one with ash in his face.

The chef cooking the boar Sæhrímnir for the Einherjar.

The mental strife and tests necessary to be re-born.

*ūruR (úrr)

Wild bull, ancestral power.

ᚦ*þurisaR (þurs)

Ettin, Troll, the twin, The Old King, the placenta.

ᚨ*ansuR (áss)

Æsir, önd (spirit), breath.


Heiðrún

The goat on the roof of Valhöll.

Secret honor.

The honor of the Einherjar.

The acumulated ancestral honor, flowing in the form of mead.

The chosen to be re-born, nourished by their accumulated honor.

ᛚ*laguR (logr)

Water.

ᛟ*ōphila (óðal)

Allodial heritage.


Valkyrjur

The choosers.

The selectors.

The fates, the wishes and will.

Represented by the chooser Freya - the egg.

ᛏ*tīwaR (Týr)

War, balance, justice.

ᛒ*berkana (bjarkan)

Birch, love - feminine, Freya.

ᛜ*ingwaR (Ing)

Frey - Yngvi Frey/Freya, the seed/egg, the kin, the ancestor and child.

ᚨ*ansuR (áss)

Æsir, önd (spirit), breath.

ᚲ*kauna (kaun)

Wound, slain.

ᚷ*gebu (gjof )

Gift.


Góndul

Valkyrje.

The bearer of the magic wand (the symbol of transition, life/death).

ᚨ*ansuR (áss)

Æsir, önd (spirit), breath.

ᚲ*kauna (kaun)

Wound, slain.

ᚷ*gebu (gjof )

Gift.


Skøgul

Valkyrje.

The chooser.

ᛒ*berkana (bjarkan)

Birch, love - feminine, Freya.

ᛜ*ingwaR (Ing)

Frey - Yngvi Frey/Freya, the seed/egg, the kin, the ancestor and child.

ᚷ*gebu (gjof )

Gift.


Hildur

Valkyrje.

The battle.

ᛏ*tīwaR (Týr)

War, balance, justice.

ᚲ*kauna (kaun)

Wound, slain.

ᚷ*gebu (gjof )

Gift.


Geri

The perfect.

The prepared.

The one wolf of Óðinn (mind/spirit).

ᚨ*ansuR (áss)

Æsir, önd (spirit), breath.


Freki

The greedy.

The strict.

The one wolf of Óðinn (mind/spirit).

ᚨ*ansuR (áss)

Æsir, önd (spirit), breath.


Huginn

The thought.

The logic.

The reason.

The one raven of Óðinn (mind/spirit).

ᚨ*ansuR (áss)

Æsir, önd (spirit), breath.


Muninn

The memory.

The inspiration.

The wishes.

The will.

The one raven of Óðinn (mind/spirit).

ᚨ*ansuR (áss)

Æsir, önd (spirit), breath.


Sleipnir

The vessel of the spirit.

The slippery one, sliding with eight legs (eternity) throughout the realms.

The horse of Óðinn (mind/spirit).

Further reading: The Horse in the Mound.

ᚨ*ansuR (áss)

Æsir, önd (spirit), breath.

ᚱ*raidu (reið)

To ride on a horse, on a chariot.

ᛖ*ehwaR (jór)

Horse.


Gugnir

The sharp thought.

The swaying one.

The spear of Óðinn (mind/spirit).

The umbilical cord, connecting the ancestor to a decendant.

Further reading on the same symbol: The sacrifice of Týr

ᛏ*tīwaR (Týr)

War, balance, justice - masculine, Týr.

The Mithra rune (MithOdin).

ᛚ*laguR (logr)

Water.


Draupnir

The ring of Óðinn (mind/spirit), dripping eight new ones every nine nights.

The eight components of man are the eight rings.


Fylgja - "follower".

Hamingja - "accumulated honour and luck".

Hamr - "silouette, shape".

Hugr - "mind".

Minni - "memory".

Ódr - "thought".

Sál - "soul".

Önd - "spirit, breath".


The corpse is Lík, the physical body.

The guardian and life-force is Vörðr.

The shape is Hamr.

The thought and soul is Hugr.

The spirit is Önd.


They drip every nine nights, the lenght of solar months it takes to create a the life of man.


ᚨ*ansuR (áss)

Æsir, önd (spirit), breath.

ᚷ*gebu (gjof )

Gift.

ᛗ*mannaR (maðr)

Man.


Hermóðr

The son of Óðinn (mind/spirit).

The messenger.

The deputy.

The bravery.

ᚱ*raidu (reið)

To ride on a horse, on a chariot.

ᚨ*ansuR (áss)

Æsir, önd (spirit), breath.


Suttungr

Ettin.

The new worry.

The new disease.

The keeper of the mead, the intellect and spiritual drink Óðinn (mind/spirit) has to obtain.

Suttungr has the same symbolism as other Ettins that have to be overcomed, keeping ancestral treasures, all symbols of the ancestral blood memory.

ᛚ*laguR (logr)

Water.

ᚢ*ūruR (úrr)

Wild bull, ancestral power.

ᚦ*þurisaR (þurs)

Ettin, Troll, the twin, The Old King, the placenta.


Þórr

The unborn child.

The redeeming child.

The one that re-incarnates.

Your loyalty.

Your willpower.

Your physical strength.

Your determination.

Your life force and honor.

The idol of the iron age farmer.

Son of Jörð.

Thunder.

Electrical voltage.

Electric circuit to soil.

Gravitation.

The powers of weather, wind and growth.

The planet Jupiter.

ᚢ*ūruR (úrr)

Wild bull, ancestral power.

ᚱ*raidu (reið)

To ride on a horse, on a chariot.

ᛋ*sōwilu (sól )

The sun. In the form of the lightning bolt (the swastika, the hammer), the returning heart/life).

ᛈ*perþu

Earth, cliff, stone, birth, luck.

ᚨ*ansuR (áss)

Æsir, önd (spirit), breath.


Þrúðvangr

The realm of Þórr.

The realm of strenght.

The field of power.

The state in wich incapsulates and drives the characteristics of Þórr.

ᚢ*ūruR (úrr)

Wild bull, ancestral power.

ᚱ*raidu (reið)

To ride on a horse, on a chariot.

ᛋ*sōwilu (sól )

The sun. In the form of the lightning bolt.

ᛈ*perþu

Earth, cliff, stone, birth, luck.

ᚨ*ansuR (áss)

Æsir, önd (spirit), breath.


Bilskilnir

The hall of Þórr.

- Bil is a prefix for a child.

- Skilnir means lightning crack, shining.

It has 540 rooms; relating to 9 solar months, cycles of 3 and 7 years of 3 cycles from a pregnancy until the age of reasoning.

The womb.

ᛈ*perþu

Earth, cliff, stone, birth, luck.

ᛟ*ōphila (óðal)

In the shape of the womb of a mother.


Tanngrisnir and Tanngnjóstr

The two goats of Þórr, pulling his chariot.

Thunder and lightning.

Goats are symbols of Pan, the adrenaline, clowed animals connected to Jörð.

The mother (Jörð) shakes and roars as Þórr rides out, like every mother does.

ᚱ*raidu (reið)

To ride on a horse, on a chariot.

ᛋ*sōwilu (sól )

The sun. In the form of the lightning bolt.